SAVOUR THE ROLEX PHENOMENON!

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Rolex image

 

Thanks to our ingenuous craftsmanship and persistence, ‘Rolex’ managed to make it to the top ten CNN African cuisines worth a treat as per 2016. According to the survey, rolex was zeroed in as one of the most budding cheap fast foods in Africa.

Hopefully we now have a match against the likes of the American cheese burger and cheese quesadillas et al.  Now this isn’t just any feat but a colossal triumph for Uganda.

This international acclaim attests to our rich Ugandan heritage punctuated with a diverse menu of impeccable food and drink.

The ‘rolex’ cuisine is mostly popular amongst university students and the usual clientele. Perhaps the populism is explained by its availability and affordability. Many rolex kiosks can be found dotted around many streets. So the appetite to grab a mouthful bite is just a step away.

More to the allure are the pocket friendly prices that range between 1500-3000/=. That’s approx. $1.This means that during hard economic meltdown, the average Ugandan is able to rely on rolex to stay afloat. “Its hassle free and always on my budget” says Fred Odeke, a boda boda rider.

Inasmuch as rolex steadily enjoys its fame, ironically it’s not popular with the urbanites. Nevertheless top gourmet chefs have challenged these stereotypes by including rolex onto their a la carte menus. So far, the reception has been promisingly welcoming to these new market entrants.

Christ! If you have been to the pearl of Africa without a taste of rolex, then you haven’t really sipped into the soul of typical Ugandanness. I mean to say almost everybody eats it, right from offices, market places and school goers’ et al. It’s more less the culinary delight anthem of Uganda.As one nimbles away, the magnitude of passion felt within is too overwhelming because rolex makes you feel at home. It reminds you of a thousand reasons to laugh out loud and be merry!

The fad has caught up in Kampala with the social calendar earmarked for events such as the #Kampala Rolex Festival Season 1! This exquisite festival will be taking place at the Uganda Museum, Kiira Road, Kampala, Uganda on Sunday, August 21 at 10am-10pm

One of the main objectives sought to be addressed is enhancing a hygienic rolex environment and youth employment as well. Actually the “rolex” business has been a main source of employment for the disgruntled disenfranchised Ugandan Youth.

Just to say, if it’s not Rolex, it’s not safe to be hungry. For starters, rolex is a traditional dish of chapatti simmered unto a hot frying pan and conjoined with a toast of egg omelette.

The dish is usually accompanied with vegetable salad such as cabbage, tomatoes, green pepper, onion and carrot rolled in-between. It gets its name from the way it’s twisted into a roll thus the name ‘Roll-eggs’, literally tongue twisted into Rolex. Coincidentally, it shares a name with the famous Swiss watch maker, Rolex.

That said, rolex defines the true identity of Uganda. It’s a mark of pride, togetherness albeit a sense of belonging to us all. In institutions such as UCU, rolex is the staple delicacy eaten amongst the student populace.

However, the history of rolex is ambiguous but nevertheless its roots can be traced back in the post-colonial days of Asian dominance. Back then, chapatti was and still is in vogue. After a while, Africans infused these culinary influences into something spicier and tastier with the egg omelettes rolled in just like the American hotdog.

On typical hot afternoons till late, rolex is prepared majorly from the commonplace streets of Bugujju, Mukono. From there, it’s mass produced and served sizzling hot to eagerly hungry campusers and townsfolk. More to the curious eye is the anticipative wait for rolex. Throngs of people queue up in makeshift kiosks just to have their share of the humble delicious pie.

As they keep hopeful wait, many usually engage in banter with reckless abandon. Perhaps, the usual melodrama of the wanainchi in this Banana republic. Delivery boys are all over the place trying to beat the eleventh hour. As the night gets young, the beehive of activity intensifies into a full blown ‘crisis’ when the dough runs out amidst impatient customers hurling impotent whimsical curses.

Amidst the hustle and bustle, the wafting aroma of rolex gets so torturously tantalizing. One cannot resist the temptation of another fill. After all, one good turn deserves another. By the eleventh hour, when all profligacy goes to slumber, in one’s and two’s, the makeshift kiosks close shop and bid farewell to the great day and await a better tomorrow.

This however is just a tip of the iceberg about rolex. Given its recent uproar of publicity, rolex can become a much bigger cash cow to our economy in terms of tourism.

Of late the Ex-Minister for Wildlife, Tourism and Antiquities, Hon. Maria Mutagamba honoured the #K’la Rolex Challenge and tookover from the roadside kiosk to make rolex to the awe of bemused bystanders and nightlife kampala revellers. See (https://www.facebook.com/holymi/videos/1057552920949223/). This unique tasty rolex experience has potential to attract some food enthusiasts, tourists and connoisseurs alike.

Foreign exchange can be earned through importation of rolex thus boosting our balance of trade. To the average Ugandan, this idea might sound crazy given that rolex can be brushed off as any other traditional dish worth not mention.

More to this wonderful story is the crazy revenue that can be amassed when curiosity kills the cat.So let’s toast to our glasses and army of cutlery to what’s been owed to us, overdue. To new triumphs and humble new beginnings! #To the ‘rolex’ Republic!

As written by Nicholas Opolot, UCU, LLB 2.

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